Nathan’s Socks

Apparently it’s been said that you should never knit for your boyfriend.  Why? Because if he doesn’t wear/appreciate whatever wonderful knit you’ve spent hours knitting for him, it can cause detriment on the relationship.  However, I disagree.  I’ve knit for every guy I’ve dated, and while those relationships didn’t last, it wasn’t because my knitwear wasn’t appreciated.

I’ll be honest – I’m always a little nervous to tell a guy I knit.  It’s mostly because I’m worried they will think I’m an old lady – going with the stereotype that only those who knit are old, which is obviously completely not true.  Surprisingly, I’ve found that every guy I tell – whether he is a potential mate or just a friend, is actually impressed that I knit, and I often get requests for knits (see my post about the Jayne Cobb hat – a request from a guy friend).

In the past, I’ve knit scarves for significant others.  Long-term boyfriend got both a grey scarf and a moss stitch white scarf to keep his warm from NY winters – I even let him pick out the yarn.  Guy I was seeing got a Harry Potter Gryffindor scarf, made from a super soft but washable yarn from Knitpicks (I made the scarf again for a friend – post will be coming soon!  It was much better the 2nd time around).

Right now I’m with an amazing, wonderful guy – Nathan.  I wanted to make his something special – not another scarf (although he has requested a scarf, so I’ll make him that next), so I pulled out Judith Durant’s Never Knit Your Man A Sweater (Unless You’ve Got The Ring) book.  A word about this book: I picked it up during long-term boyfriend.  It has some great patterns from men (and a few not-so-great ones, including vests that your grandfather would wear), including hats, scarves, gloves and computer cases.  Oh, and the socks I decided to knit Nathan.  If you’ve got a boyfriend (or brother – I’ve made my brothers hats from it) then I highly suggest picking up this book.

Anyway, I decided to make Nathan socks.  He’s recently moved to Chicago to get his Master of Law degree in Taxation from Northwestern – and has never lived in Chicago.  I grew up there, and being very aware of how cold it is (plus, add the Lake Effect and suddenly the temperature drops 20 degrees), I decided to go with a thick, warm sock.  I took a quick trip to my local knitting store, The Flying Needles, where I found Berroco’s Vintage yarn, which is a soft, washable yarn (because we all know guys won’t pay attention to “hand wash and line dry” – just do a washable yarn and save yourself from the heartache of seeing a time-intensive knit shrink).

This was my very first sock project, so I was unsure what to expect.  I ended up using the magic loop method instead of double-pointed needles, which I found to be much easier and quicker.  

I really like the finished product!  I want to knit myself a pair for when I go visit him!

Note: The pattern called for 2 balls of the yarn – I ended up using one and just a few yards of the other one.  I would knit a shorter top of the sock and just use one ball – I actually am planning to make another pair that way using the leftover yarn.  I also knit elastic thread into the first inch of the cuff – just to help the socks stay up.  I ended up using 2 spools of the elastic thread.

Advertisements

Hot Water Bottle Cover

I grew up in a household that firmly believed in holistic medicine to cure ailments.  So if I was congested or had a sore throat, I would just fill up a hot water bottle and rest.  I still find that it works great, but I no longer have my lamb cover for my hot water bottle.  In an effort to reduce my yarn stash, I figured this would be a quick knit.

I found a pattern on the Knit Picks website http://www.knitpicks.com/cfpatterns/pattern_display.cfm?ID=50821220.

For this pattern, I used a yarn that I (think) picked up at Walmart, although I know I have seen it at Michaels.  It’s called Simply Soft Eco by Carron.  The cool thing about this yarn is that it is made from recycled plastic bottles.

This picture is a little dark.  There were 2 seed stitch options.  I decided to use the twisted seed stitch, which gave it a pretty texture:

The pattern called for an i-cord string to close the cover, but I had some extra ribbon, so I just used that instead

This pattern didn’t take long to knit up…I would work on it while I watched Downton Abbey, Season 2!